Somali
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Topic "Immunisation" in Somali - total 26 documents

Title: A reminder for parents about immunisation
Summary: It's not only babies, toddlers and children who need to be immunised against common childhood illnesses - parents, grandparents and carers do too. You could unwittingly give a serious illness to your child if your immunisation status is not kept up-to-date.

Title: BCG (Bacillus Calmette-Guerin) vaccination - Information for Patients
Summary: Information about the BCG (Bacillus Calmette-Guerin) vaccination to help prevent tuberculosis (TB), including who should have the vaccination and who should not, its advantages and disadvantages, and the side effects.

Title: Being tested for tuberculosis
Summary: Sometimes people can become infected with tuberculosis (TB) germs without getting the actual disease. The Mantoux test, also called the tuberculin skin test, can show if the person has ever been infected by TB germs. TB infection does not mean the person has the disease, but if someone has been infected there is a chance they might get sick with TB in the future.

Title: Chickenpox vaccination - Year 7 school based immunisation program
Summary: The chickenpox (varicella) vaccine is now offered to all children in Year 7 at school. If your child has already received a chickenpox vaccine or has a reliable history of chickenpox infection, no further doses are required. Please complete the relevant sections on the consent card and return the form to school. The chickenpox vaccine contains modified live virus at a reduced strength and a small amount of the antibiotic, neomycin.

Title: Childhood pneumococcal disease
Summary: Pneumococcal disease is a major cause of hospitalisation and death among children less than five years of age in Australia. Children under one year of age have the highest risk of pneumococcal meningitis. Therefore the earlier this immunisation is given the better because the age peak it affects is very young.

Title: Diphtheria and tetanus immunisation information
Summary: This fact sheet provides information about the Diphtheria and Tetanus vaccination, who should be immunised and possible side effects.

Title: Diphtheria, tetanus and whooping cough (pertussis) vaccine information and consent form - Year 7 secondary school students
Summary: The diphtheria, tetanus and whooping cough (pertussis) vaccine is offered to all children in Year 7 of secondary school or aged 12 to 13 years in the community setting. The sheet lists possible side effects and provides a pre-immunisation checklist

Title: Diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis (whooping cough) booster vaccine for 18 month old children
Summary: The National Immunisation Program schedule provides free diphtheria-tetanus-whooping cough vaccine to children at 18 months of age.

Title: Diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough) and poliomyelitis (polio) immunisation
Summary: The National Immunisation Program schedule provides free diphtheria, tetanus, whooping cough and polio vaccine to children at four years of age. The sheet lists possible side effects and provides a pre-immunisation checklist.

Title: Diphtheria, tetanus, whooping cough, hepatitis B, polio and Hib vaccine for infants
Summary: The National Immunisation Program provides free diphtheria, tetanus, whooping cough, hepatitis B, polio and Hib vaccine to infants at two, four and six months of age. This document provides a pre-immunisation checklist and information about side effects. Includes diphtheria, tetanus and whooping cough (pertussis) vaccine consent form

Title: Haemophilus influenzae type b and Meningococcal C (Hib-MenC)
Summary: The National Immunisation Program provides free combined Hib and meningococcal C vaccine for protection against Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) and meningococcal group C disease to children at 12 months of age.

Title: HPV vaccine
Summary: An overview of the human papillomavirus (HPV), the vaccine, and how to get the vaccine.

Title: Human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV) - Year 7 secondary school-based program
Summary: The HPV vaccine is offered to all children in Year 7 at secondary school or aged 12 to 13 years in the community setting.

Title: Important facts about Rubella for the whole community
Summary: This document contains information on Rubella, including Facts, Prevention and Treatment

Title: Infant hepatitis B immunisation information
Summary: Information about the hepatitis B vaccine given to newborn babies. Includes information about the disease, why babies should have the vaccine, and information about possible side effects. It is important to start the hepatitis B immunisation as soon as possible after birth.

Title: Measles, Mumps, Rubella, Varicella - Information for parents
Summary: The new combination MMRV vaccine protects against four common childhood illnesses in a single vaccine. These illnesses can lead to serious complications such as encephalitis (brain inflammation), meningitis (infection of the tissues surrounding the brain), congenital rubella syndrome (can cause severe malformations in babies born to mothers infected with rubella during pregnancy) and bacterial skin infections (can cause scarring).

Title: Meningococcal secondary school vaccine program consent form
Summary: This document provides information about the four-in-one combined vaccine for protection against meningococcal A, C, W, Y strains that is free to 15-19 year olds in Victoria until 31 December 2017. It must be signed by the parents/carers of eligible young people under 18 years old so they can receive the vaccine at secondary school.

Title: Parents' free whooping cough (pertussis) vaccine
Summary: From 1 June 2015, pregnant women and parents (including adoptive parents and foster parents) of newborn babies born on or after 1 June 2015 (before the baby is six months old) are eligible for a free whooping cough vaccine.

Title: Polio immunisation information
Summary: People in Australia need to be immunised against polio. A recent case in Victoria alerts us to the need for ongoing immunisation against polio. There are still cases of the disease overseas, and there is a risk of it being re-established here if children and adults are not immunised.

Title: Pre-immunisation checklist
Summary: A checklist for immunisation providers to use to decide the best immunisation schedule for a patient.

Title: Rotavirus immunisation information
Summary: Rotavirus is the most common cause of severe gastroenteritis in infants and young children in Australia. Protection against rotavirus is available free of charge under the National Immunisation Program Schedule. In Victoria, immunisation against rotavirus is free for babies, and it is given by mouth in three doses at two, four and six months of age.

Title: Rubella Information (with special emphasis for women of childbearing age)
Summary: Fact sheet on rubella, an infectious disease which can harm unborn babies. Includes information on how the disease is spread, symptoms, prevention and immunisation.

Title: Starting childcare or kindergarten: Immunisation information for parents enrolling a child
Summary: The 'No Jab, No Play' law aims to improve vaccination rates and reduce the prevalence and spread of disease. Before enrolling a child, early childhood services will have to first obtain evidence that the child is: either fully immunised for their age, or on a vaccination catch-up program, or unable to be fully immunised for medical reasons. 'Conscientious objection' is not an exemption under the 'No Jab No Play' legislation.

Title: Starting primary school? School entry immunisation status certificates
Summary: Vaccination at four years of age is important. This fact sheet explains the school entry immunisation certificate.

Title: Tuberculosis Treatment
Summary: Information for people who are to start tuberculosis treatment. It includes potential side effects of main TB medications.

Title: Vaccine side effects
Summary: Common side effects occur soon after vaccination and last 1 to 2 days. Generally no treatment is required. Download the document to find out more.

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